So it Goes.
elizabethlong.net
So it Goes.
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Two Mademoiselles in Maine
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enchantedsleeper:

Lady in Yellow (1899), Max Kurzweil
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benpaddon:

The phrase “words to live by” gets thrown around often these days, but these are absolutely words to live by.
benpaddon:

The phrase “words to live by” gets thrown around often these days, but these are absolutely words to live by.
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somersault1824:

The family Fulgoridae is a large group of hemipteran insects, especially abundant and diverse in the tropics, containing over 125 genera worldwide. Various genera and species (especially the genera Fulgora and Pyrops) are sometimes referred to as lanternflies or lanthorn flies, though they do not emit light.
via Science Frenzy
#naturephotography http://ift.tt/1hqLXdI
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teganquinruinedmylife:

teganquinruinedmylife:

I’m giving this to my history teacher

Today is the day
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"What is interesting, is that the Frida Kahlo venerated by American feminists is a very different Frida Kahlo to the one people learn about in Mexico, in the Chicano community. In her country, she is recognized as an important artist and a key figure in revolutionary politics of early 20th century Mexico. Her communist affiliations are made very clear. Her relationship with Trotsky is underscored. All her political activities with Diego Rivera are constantly emphasized. The connection between her art and her politics is always made. When Chicana artists became interested in Frida Kahlo in the ‘70s and started organizing homages, they made the connection between her artistic project and theirs because they too were searching for an aesthetic compliment to a political view that was radical and emancipatory. But when the Euro-American feminists latch onto Frida Kahlo in the early ‘80s and when the American mainstream caught on to her, she was transformed into a figure of suffering. I am very critical of that form of appropriation."
Coco Fusco on her Amerindians piece from 1992 with Guillermo Gómez-Peña (via tofunkey)
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likeafieldmouse:

Jake Longstreth - Particulate Matter (2014)
likeafieldmouse:

Jake Longstreth - Particulate Matter (2014)
likeafieldmouse:

Jake Longstreth - Particulate Matter (2014)
likeafieldmouse:

Jake Longstreth - Particulate Matter (2014)
likeafieldmouse:

Jake Longstreth - Particulate Matter (2014)
likeafieldmouse:

Jake Longstreth - Particulate Matter (2014)
likeafieldmouse:

Jake Longstreth - Particulate Matter (2014)
likeafieldmouse:

Jake Longstreth - Particulate Matter (2014)
likeafieldmouse:

Jake Longstreth - Particulate Matter (2014)
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smithsonianlibraries:

smithsonianlibraries:

Narwhals are Magic.

Now with proof!  Secrets of the narwhal’s tusk have recently been revealed in research headed by Martin Nweeia, a practicing dentist and clinical instructor at the Harvard School of Dental Medicine, who just happens to also be a member of the Vertebrate Zoology Department of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History. With a team of researchers/coauthors, including Jim Mead, Vertebrate Zoology Curator Emeritus and Charlie Potter, Marine Mammals Collection Manager, Nweeia just published a paper in the journal The Anatomical Record about the discovery of neural pathways that run from the narwhal’s tusk to its brain. The arctic whale’s unicorn-like tusk acts as a sensor, specifically detecting variations in water salinity. Read more on the Smithsonian Science blog, or see the original article at Anatomical Record (You might want to head to your local library to see if they have access since it’s behind a paywall).
There are some pretty great images of narwhal’s over on the Biodiversity Heritage Library’s Flickr page, too.